Against company policy dating co worker

If indeed that’s how your company does it, that’s sex discrimination and is illegal.

(Or at least it’s illegal if your company is big enough to be covered by federal discrimination statutes — meaning that it has 15 or more employees.) As for the question of whether they need reasonable suspicion, employers don’t generally need “proof” before taking disciplinary action against employees in matter, but because the issue of romantic relations is a sticky one, I turned to employment attorney Bryan Cavanaugh to weigh in.

Tempting as it may be, dating a coworker or boss or colleague can turn out to be super awkward and traumatic.

Sometimes it may lead to a tarnished professional reputation, and even job-loss.

The employer can act on its suspicions and circumstantial evidence.” This is basically the same as if your employer suspected you of violating any other policy (or even doing something they didn’t like, whether prohibited by a policy or not): If, for instance, your employer suspected you of being rude to clients or watching too much You Tube at your desk, they wouldn’t need to present you with evidence. In this case, though, Bryan goes on to say that they’d still be wise to only act if they have solid evidence: “Acting on flimsy suspicions would only serve to alienate employees, lower morale because they fear ‘big brother’ is prying into their personal lives, and risk losing good and loyal employees without a good reason.

If an employee was let go under this policy without solid evidence and that employee came back and alleged the real reason for the discharge was gender, race, age, etc., then the employer would have a weak defense since its ‘legitimate business reason’ for the termination was so flimsy.” So there are the facts on legality. From the employer’s side, there are all kinds of reasons not to want couples in your organization — but banning dating upon penalty of firing is a very old-fashioned policy and out of touch with how most modern workplaces operate.

You may get fired if the fraternization interferes with your work or goes against company policy.Depending on your company's policy, fraternization can include romantic relations between managers and subordinates and relationships between co-workers.Fraternization in the workplace is often frowned upon because it can negatively affect work performance and might compromise the integrity of the company.Even if your company policy doesn’t explicitly state anything against engaging in romantic relationships at the office, don’t give your HR executive a reason to keep their eyes on you.No one needs to see your public display of affection.

Leave a Reply